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3 Ways to Include Non-Golfers in Fundraising Golf Tournaments

A golf tournament is an excellent way to bring people together for entertainment and networking. Whether you’re raising money for a charity or simply thanking clients and employees, a golf tournament is sure to provide quality time for all participants.

Unfortunately, non-golfers who are involved in the tournament planning are inadvertently left out of the golf-specific aspect of the event. Although they are normally happy to volunteer and attend luncheons and award dinners, they are missing out on the key ingredient – the game itself. Here are a few examples of how you might be able to draw more non-golfer interest in your event.

1. Offer Group Instruction

Many non-golfers are interested in learning how to play the game, but won’t necessarily initiate the instruction process on their own. It is very simple to set up group instruction during the course of tournament play. Many golf pros are happy to offer either a free, or drastically reduced rate, for one-time groups because it gives them the opportunity to enroll the participants in follow up private instruction after the event. 

You might consider structuring the clinic into three sessions – 1) Etiquette, Basic Rules & Golf Lingo, 2) Short Game, 3) Long Game. Each session could easily last for one hour with a few breaks in between. This would take up at least 3/4 of the time the golfers are out on the course. This type of set up is a great introduction to the game and might convert non-golfers into golfers who will play in future events. You could offer the group instruction for free or make it an option for the entry fee.

2. Train Volunteers as Caddies

One of the best ways to learn about the game is to see it in action. Consider offering a caddy as an upgrade option on your entry fee. This works best for smaller tournament fields as well as nine-hole tournaments. Volunteer caddies could be trained in basic responsibilities in as little as 30 minutes. This is a unique and fun way to get everyone directly involved in tournament play.

3. Set Up a Putting Course

There’s no reason why you can’t set up a tournament within a tournament. While the golfers are out playing on the full course, the non-golfers can compete in a 9-hole or 18-hole putting tournament. This is a great way to introduce them to most important stroke in golf. Consider offering prizes or awards just as you would for the full tournament winners. The first place winner could be awarded the opportunity to attempt a Putt Fore Cash from 40, 50 or 60 feet to win up to $25,000. It is best set up as a “grandstand event” which means that everyone gathers around to watch the attempt immediately following tournament play.


Written by Becky McGowan of www.golftournament.com
Former Collegiate Golfer and LPGA Instructor, Presently Sales Manager/Partner at GolfTournament.com, 20+ Years Experience in Golf Industry



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